William H. Taft 1920 Two-Page Typed Letter Signed – Taft Blasts President Wilson

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27th President.  Two-page typed letter signed (TLS) “Wm. H. Taft”, first page headed “William H. Taft / New Haven, Connecticut”, sent from Titusville, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1920, 8×10.5, sent to Gus Karger, the Washington correspondent to the Cincinnati Times-Star and a long-time friend to Taft, in full:

I thank you for sending me the statement introduced by Hitchcock.  It is just what I wanted.  I see the President is out this morning in a letter to Hitchcock, in which he shows himself as unyielding and as far behind the time and the situation as might be expected.  He goes back on Hitchcock and all the Senators who signed the agreement in respect to Article X contained in Hitchcock’s resolution; and if they had a spark of self-respect, they would allow him to assume the responsibility, and vote for the Treaty with the reservations, but they haven’t, I suppose, and the Treaty is doomed.  But the Democratic party will be buried more deeply than ever by reason of this attitude of Wilson’s.  His real character is being shown, and he is about as unpopular as he could have made himself had he tried.  I was afraid that the situation might make it necessary for me to hesitate how I should vote in the next election, but Wilson’s destruction of the Treaty and the abject submission to his perversity, egotism and blindness of the Democratic Senators, create issues in the struggle which I shall enter in enthusiastic disgust with Wilson and all his crowd.

We were in Canada last week, and we had on the whole a successful visit.  I am now working my way down through Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana to the South.  It is a long course ahead of us, but we have finished one month out of five and still live.

One handwritten correction and cross-out by Taft within the text.

Karger was the press chief of William Howard Taft’s 1908 presidential campaign and director of the Republican Party’s press bureau in the 1912 presidential election.

Paperclip impressions at top left of each leaf, folds, browning.