Herbert Hoover Document Signed as President – Letter To Congress

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31st President.¬† Two-page typed document signed¬†“Herbert Hoover”, legal folio, Washington, D.C., January 10, 1933, headed “To The Senate and House of Representatives”.

The document is Hoover’s “Message to the Congress on the International Convention for the Suppression of International Trade in Arms and Ammunition and Implements of War”, in part:

Recent events have emphasized the urgent need of more authority to the Executive in control of the shipment of arms from the United States for military purposes. There can be no doubt that the control of such shipments to areas of prospective and actual international conflict would greatly aid the earnest and unceasing efforts which all nations now make to prevent and lessen the dangers of such conflicts.

However for one nation alone to engage in such prohibitions while other nations continue to supply arms is a futility. Moreover it would tend to give advantage to one nation over another by increasing the war potentialities in manufacture and skill of non-cooperating nations.

There is before the Senate an international convention for the suppression of international trade in arms and ammunition and implements of war signed at Geneva, June 17, 1925, awaiting ratification. This convention has been adhered to by a large number of other important nations and is practically stopped through failure of the United States to adhere to it. Its ratification would contribute to the ends being sought by the entire world for the prevention and limitation of war. I earnestly urge that this convention should be ratified…

Receipt stamp of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs at top right, with original folds and staple holes at top left, else very good.

The Geneva Protocol of 1925 prohibits the use of ‘asphyxiating, poisonous or other gases, and of all analogous liquids, materials or devices’ and ‘bacteriological methods of warfare’. It was not ratified by the U.S. Senate until 1975.