Benjamin Harrison 1890 Letter Signed as President – “The State Had Come So Recently Into The Union”

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23rd President.

Three-page manuscript letter signed “Benj. Harrison” AS PRESIDENT, Washington, October 15, 1890, 8×9.75 four-page Executive Mansion stationery, to Cornelius Bliss, in full:

I find your letter of the 4th instant here on my return from the west, and notice your request as to Mr. Reed.  I regret to say that the appointment at Ranagarva was made sometime ago.  Mr. Gowey, of the State of Washington, was appointed and confirmed, I think before the adjournment of the Senate.

That State had come so recently into the Union that it was neglected in the earlier appointments and a very strong plea was made that this inequality should be righted.  I beg to assure you that your personal interest in Mr. Reed will give him a high standing with me, if something acceptable can be found which I can send in the direction of New York.  Senator Hiscock, before leaving here talked to me about Mr. Reed and spoke specially of your strong interest in him.

I find myself on my return from a three thousand mile journey which was puncuated by very frequent speeches, not so tired as I expected; indeed, I am feeling quite fresh.  I found our people in the west very hopeful and full of spirit.  My reception by citizens of all parties was everything I could have desired in the way of cordiality and respect.  I will be glad to see you at any time here

Interesting content as Harrison had admitted Washington into the Union as the 42nd state on November 11, 1889.  His “three thousand mile journey” almost certainly revolved around the upcoming midterm elections – which would see a Democratic sweep of the House and the Republican majority in the Senate fall to eight, which would be a precursor to Harrison losing the 1892 election.

Cornelius N. Bliss was a member of President McKinley’s Cabinet, serving as Secretary of the Interior.

In very good condition, folds, some wear and hardened remnants from previous mounting on verso of terminal page.